“Establish yourself in who God says you are!”

You are created in the image of God (Gen. 1:27)! You are a child of God (John 1:12)! You are a chosen people and a royal priesthood (1 Pet. 2:9)! And, you have been raised with Christ (Col. 3:1). It is far more important to know what God says about you than what others say about you!

Words to Live By — “To God, you are special!”

REMEBER WHO YOU ARE – “But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.” 1 Peter 2:9

“Your Anointing is Dangerous, but it’s Worth It!”

 

A shepherd boy who had been forgotten when Samuel came to call, David was treated as a “less than” by everyone who knew him the most, except God.

God, looking past his outer array saw something special in him. He instructed Samuel to “Arise, anoint him: for this is he,” (1 Samuel 16:12). Following God’s lead, “Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren: and the Spirit of the LORD came upon David from that day forward,” (1 Samuel 16:13).

Not only had he been empowered and anointed by God’s Spirit on that day, but ever since then, his life has never been the same. Because of the anointing on his life, David experienced ups and downs; he experienced victories, and he experienced times of loss. But, in the end, he is still known as one of Israel’s greatest kings; as the bloodline through whom our Lord Jesus Christ came, and as a man after God’s own heart, Acts 13:22.

What David gained, Saul lost. As David became empowered by God’s Spirit, Saul was stripped of this anointed pleasure and replaced by something evil, 1 Samuel 16:14. This made David a continual target of hatred and adversity. What started out as a relationship of love (1 Samuel 16:21) quickly turned to envy and hatred after David returned from the slaughter of the Philistines because the women of the city sang, “Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands,” (1 Samuel 18:7).

Saul knew he was on a downward spiral and as a bird of prey perched to claim his next victim, “Saul eyed David from that day and forward,” (1 Samuel 18:9). Even when David was sent to relieve Saul of the distressing spirit that had come upon him, his life became an endangered treasure as the javelin of hatred whisked through the air intent on taking his life, 1 Samuel 18:10-11.

The LORD was with David. The people loved David. The anointing was on David, but that didn’t mean people wouldn’t try to squash what God was trying to accomplish in his life. David was at times a fugitive, constantly on the run, but he escaped time and again in what I am attributing to the providence of God.

At one point, in a dark cave in the wilderness of En-gedi, David had the opportunity to rid himself of the provocation of Saul once and for all. Yet, David refused to come against anything or anyone who had once been anointed by God, 1 Samuel 24:6.

This did not immediately vanquish Saul’s pursuit of David. Not until Saul perished in the battle against the Philistines did David become free of this enemy who pursued his life, 1 Samuel 31.

Hear this, we may not be aligned to be a great king of Israel or the like, but the Bible tells us, “Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people,” (1 Peter 2:9a). The anointing on your life makes you and me something and someone special before God.

The rest of 1 Peter 2:9 states, “That ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.” Because God has poured His oil of anointing, through the power of His Holy Spirit, upon each and everyone that belongs to Him, we are designed to make a mark for Him in this world.

This anointing will bring enemies and battles, and yes, at times may seem dangerous, yet, “He which stablisheth us with you in Christ, and hath anointed us, is God,” (2 Corinthians 1:21). God is the one that has anointed us, and “If God be for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31).

Through Jesus Christ; through the power of His Spirit in us, we have been called and blessed to walk in the power of all God designed each one of us to be. Don’t let your circumstances dictate your anointing. Don’t let the Saul’s of your life pierce through what God has divinely appointed for you. David ran for his life yet God’s plan for him never faltered. He was set aside for the Master’s use, and so are we.

There will always been adversity against God’s anointing, but if God anointed you choose today to walk in all that He has blessed you to be. Your anointing may seem dangerous at times, but in the end, it is well worth it. Just ask David.

Photo Source: Pixabay

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“Privileged Responsibility”

Photo Credit: Kevin Payravi, Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Kevin Payravi, Wikimedia Commons

” For unto whomever is given, of him shall much be required,” Luke 12:48

In 1998 a movie titled “Ever After: A Cinderella Story” starring Drew Barrymore came out.  Over the years this has become one of my favorite movies to watch because it gives a realistic human experience to that fairy tale of old.  With a comedic twist is shows one way that this romance could have played out if it were real.

The so-called Prince Charming in this movie had a name, it was Henry.  Henry was a some-what spoiled prince who didn’t always want to operate under his parents rule.  He didn’t want to be king and he didn’t want to be forced into marriage with a complete stranger because of obligation.  It was around this time when his mother Queen Marie said, “Sweetheart . . . you were born to privilege and with that comes specific obligations,” (IMDb).

This quote came to my mind one day as I was traveling on a busy road in my neighborhood.  Traffic was running pretty smoothly that day.  There were several cars in front of me including an unmarked police car.  As we began to approach the intersection the light turned red for us.  After a few seconds of sitting somebody got impatient.  You got it, the police car.  He turned on his lights and sirens then proceeded through the red light.  I watched to see if he was in fact attending to an emergency or if he used his privileges as a police officer to do something the rest of us could not.  Well, by now you should know the answer.  When he got to the other side of the intersection the lights and sirens were turned off and he drove on as if everything were okay.

I thought to myself the shame of it all.  Here is a man in a respected office, but instead of being an example to the civilians around him he chose to spot his office by acting as any ordinary man.  He ran the red light, point-blank.

As frustrating as it may be to see these occurrences, it also gives a very vivid example of our role in Christ.  1 Peter 2:9 declares, “But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him  who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light,” (KJV).  What this verse does is speak of a royal lineage in Christ.  It tells us the office we now hold is not that of the common man.  Prince Henry was born a royal, but we were born-again to live royally the privileged life that He offers us.  That which He extends to us is enormously, wonderfully blessed.  But, with it comes responsibility.

The latter half of the above verse says we are to “shew forth the praises of Him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.”  What that means is that we are to magnify our office.  We are to bring glory to Him through our life.  We are to show the world what it means to have Christ save you and to give you the privileged life.  It’s not by running the “red lights” of life, rather it’s done by walking circumspectly, Eph. 5:15.  It’s done by patiently enduring those “red lights” in life that try to hinder our progress in Christ because we are an example to the world.

The world is watching us.  They want to see if the life we claim to have in Christ is real.  Our day-to-day affairs become our living testimony.  It does not matter if your days are spent in an office, on a construction site, or even as an at-home mom; someone is watching you to see how you “shew forth the praises of him who hath called you.”  What will they see?  Someone who is responsible with their privileged life – a life that will draw men to Christ?  Or, will they see a “red light” runner; someone who taints their office?  “For unto whomever much is given, of him shall much be required,” (Luke 12:48, KJV).

“Your Anointing is Dangerous, but it’s Worth It!”

My Project 440-001

A shepherd boy who had been forgotten when Samuel came to call, David was treated as a “less than” by everyone who knew him the most, except God.

God, looking past his outer array saw something special in him. He instructed Samuel to, “Arise, anoint him: for this is he,” (1 Samuel 16:12). Following God’s lead, “Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of his brethren: and the Spirit of the LORD came upon David from that day forward,” (1 Samuel 16:13).

Not only had he been empowered and anointed by God’s Spirit on that day, but ever since then his life has never been the same. Because of the anointing on his life David experienced ups and downs; he experienced victories, and he experienced times of loss. But, in the end, he is still known as one of Israel’s greatest kings; as the blood line through whom our Lord Jesus Christ came, and as a man after God’s own heart, Acts 13:22.

What David gained, Saul lost. As David became empowered by God’s Spirit, Saul was stripped of this anointed pleasure and replaced by something evil, 1 Samuel 16:14. This made David a continual target of hatred and adversity. What started out as a relationship of love (1 Samuel 16:21) quickly turned to envy and hatred after David returned from the slaughter of the Philistines because the women of the city sang, “Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands,” (1 Samuel 18:7).

Saul knew he was on a downward spiral and as a bird of prey perched to claim his next victim, “Saul eyed David from that day and forward,” (1 Samuel 18:9). Even when David was sent to relieve Saul of the distressing spirit that had come upon him, his life became an endangered treasure as the javelin of hatred whisked through the air intent on taking his life, 1 Samuel 18:10-11.

The LORD was with David. The people loved David. The anointing was on David, but that didn’t mean people wouldn’t try to squash what God was trying to accomplish in his life. David was at times a fugitive, constantly on the run, but he escaped time and again in what I am attributing to the providence of God.

At one point, in a dark cave in the wilderness of En-gedi, David had the opportunity to rid himself of the provocation of Saul once and for all. Yet, David refused to come against anything or anyone who had once been anointed by God, 1 Samuel 24:6.

This did not immediately vanquish Saul’s pursuit of David. Not until Saul perished in the battle against the Philistines did David become free of this enemy who pursued his life, 1 Samuel 31.

Hear this, we may not be aligned to be a great king of Israel or the like, but the Bible tells us, “Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people,” (1 Peter 2:9a). The anointing on your life makes you and me something and someone special before God.

The rest of 1 Peter 2:9 states, “That ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.” Because God has poured His oil of anointing, through the power of His Holy Spirit, upon each and every one that belongs to Him, we are designed to make a mark for Him in this world.

This anointing will bring enemies and battles, and yes, at times may seem dangerous, yet, “He which stablisheth us with you in Christ, and hath anointed us, is God,” (2 Corinthians 1:21). God is the one that has anointed us, and “If God be for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31).

Through Jesus Christ; through the power of His Spirit in us, we have been called and blessed to walk in the power of all God designed each one of us to be. Don’t let your circumstances dictate your anointing. Don’t let the Saul’s of your life pierce through what God has divinely appointed for you. David ran for his life yet God’s plan for him never faltered. He was set aside for the Master’s use, and so are we.

There will always been adversity against God’s anointing, but if God anointed you choose today to walk in all that He has blessed you to be. Your anointing may seem dangerous at times, but in the end it is well worth it. Just ask David.